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    Float the EdgeThe Angelica Sanchez Trio
    Float The Edge
    (Clean Feed, 2017)
    more details


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    320 kbps | 103 MB | UL | OB

    Tracklist:
    1. Good Enough For Me (4:54)
    2. Rhythm And Blues (3:22)
    3. Good Friend Again (3:26)
    4. Finn (5:43)
    5. Safe And Secure (3:25)
    6. Bad News (3:20)
    7. Copenhagen 30-6 (4:34)
    8. Hold On (2:41)
    9. Struck Gold (3:56)
    10. Gimme A Smile (3:07)


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    320 kbps | 106 MB | UL | OB |

    Garrett Newton is an exceptional banjo player. Not only can he play banjo, he can talk banjo with the best. He is presently touring with Lorraine Jordan and Carolina Road in their “Country Grass” tour featuring his banjo playing. Garrett fronts his own band, the Garrett Newton Band. He has played on stage with national artists such as Marty Raybon, Kenny Ingram, Ben Greene, Steve Dilling, and James King.


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    160 kbps | 73 MB | UL |

    Shooting Stars and Tiny Tears is Daniel Meade at home, alone. Taking some time out from his increasingly frenetic schedule (tours with his band The Flying Mules and a recent jaunt around the UK playing keyboards with Ocean Colour Scene), he has returned to the DIY concept of his first solo album As Good As Bad Can Be playing all instruments here and harmonising with himself. As on As Good As Bad Can Be there’s a definite homemade quality to the recordings with little of the dynamics one can achieve when playing with a band. On the other hand Meade writes songs of great quality and assembles them in his home studio with such skill that the album is so much more than a collection of demos, rather it’s an intimate collection of songs that reflect his Tin Pan Alley, country and honky tonk influences.

    According to Meade the album grew out of a writing project he set himself with the aim of writing a song within an hour and then allowing himself four hours to record it. There was a theme of sorts as the songs would all revolve around notions of romance with Meade inspired through his relationship with his girlfriend. As the exercise progressed it grew legs until the realisation that here was an actual album in the making and consequently it’s unleashed here.

    Anyone who has seen Meade and his Mules hit the stage will know that they can whip up quite the storm but Meade has also demonstrated that he’s well able to delve into classic sad country mode with the prime example perhaps Help Me Tonight, a classic tearjerker. Shooting Stars and Tiny Tears leans heavily in this direction with none of the Jerry Lee type rockers in sight. Sure enough there are some up tempo numbers which jaunt along in a fine skiffle and country blues style as on I Wanted Nothing and One Is All I Need, the former recalling Big Bill Broonzy, the latter a grand singalong around the old Joanna with a hint of cockney voiced sixties beat bands (with Meade’s piano playing here a triumph as it barrels in and out of the song). There’s a delightful innocence in the gleeful acoustic skip of Your Voice At Night while How Long Does It Take To Fall In Love reeks of barroom honky tonk as the instruments tumble over each other. In all of these songs Meade’s words are just about perfect, self contained couplets which match the masters be it the lonesome lyricism of Hank Williams or the more pop orientated Felice and Boudleaux Bryant. Indeed the exuberant delivery of I Got Something with Meade multitracked vocally would sit easily within the Everly Brothers canon. As good as these songs are they pale somewhat when Meade settles into his lonesome persona. The title song, which opens the album, is a delight as he strums gently around a poetic love song suffused with heavenly imagery. He closes the album with another simple song, just voice and guitar on Today Doesn’t Matter which again recalls the high lonesome balladry of classic Hank.

    It’s a measure of Meade’s talent that this homespun project opens up to reveal a songwriter who is immersed in the well travelled roads of his forbears and is able to add his own fresh take on time honoured traditions. Forever restless he’s off soon to tour in Europe and he promises another Flying Mules later this year but in the meantime this is a great listen.


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    Gracia...

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    obrigad...

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     :obrigado...

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    TohpatiIndonesian guitarist and composer Tohpati, like his countrymen Dewa Budjana and Dwiki Dharmawan, is a busy studio musician who somehow manages to keep several of his own distinct musical projects moving in parallel. The most well-known of these is probably simakDialog, best described as an Indonesian jam band whose copious recorded output has been cut short by the recent tragic death of keyboardist Riza Arshad. In addition to his work with simakDialog, Tohpati has documented a few of his own projects, notably Tohpati Bertiga (an all-Indonesian bass-drums-guitar power trio) and a working trio with US-based jazz luminaries Chad Wackerman and Jimmy Haslip. Perhaps this furious pace explains the six-year gap between albums by his flagship group, Ethnomission.

    125  MB  320 ** FLAC

    Ethnomission’s previous album Save the Planet (Moonjune Records, 2010) is arguably one of the finest jazz-rock releases of its time, and the success of their follow-up, Mata Hati, proves that Tohpati’s musical acumen is no fluke. On the surface, a fusion of jazz, progressive rock, funk and Indonesian ethnic music sounds like a can’t- miss proposition. But there’s much more than facile eclecticism going on in Tohpati’s music. The potency of his compositions and solos on Mata Hati stem from a deep understanding of several parallel musical worlds, and a unique and uncompromising artistic vision that permits him to juxtapose these disparate elements in ways that engage both the heart and the mind. Also key to the effort is the stability and musical chemistry of his band: all personnel present on Save the Planet returned five-plus years later to record Mata Hati.

    The music, as ever, is a highly focused, multi-dimensional sort of jazz-rock-ethnic fusion. The compositions are knotty and complex, but not mathematical-sounding. Their well-defined solo spaces prohibit noodling. Diki Suwarjiki’s suling—a traditional flute fashioned from long, thin-walled bamboo—has a sweet and decidedly Asian sound that penetrates (unbelievably) through the din of the drums, bass and percussion and provides an interesting counterpoint to Tohpati’s visceral jazz-rock guitar sound. Suwarjiki occasionally switches to the tarompet which is a non-tempered double reed instrument not unlike a shawm. Endang Ramdan’s kendang percussion sounds a little like congas or perhaps bata drums, though a tad higher in pitch. Mata Hati is peppered with brief, head-spinning, trickily syncopated unison percussion breaks with drummer Demas Narawangsa which are not unlike those heard in Latin music. Narawangsa, by the way, is a remarkable player with world-class fusion and jazz chops. The heart of the band, though, is the phenomenal Indro Hardjodikoro whose fluent, mobile basslines are on par with James Jamerson’s or Jaco Pastorius.’

    The orchestrally-enhanced “Janger” opens the set with a cinematic flourish, though Tohpati gets to work right away with a blazing solo that’s followed by a passage featuring suling and kendang. “Pelog Rock” refers to one of the two most important scales used in Javanese and Balinese gamelan music (the other being slendro). Like several other tracks on Mata Hati, its vaguely malevolent, percussion-heavy proto-metal sound is reminiscent of some of the things that Robert Fripp is up to these days with the ever-evolving King Crimson. If anything, the crunchier, more aggressive sounds heard on tracks such as “Pelog Rock,” “Pangkur,” and “Amarah” point to a new direction for this fascinating band. The exceptionally hooky title track and the largely acoustic “Rancak” show that Tohpati has not strayed too far from his roots in the Indonesian folk and pop worlds. “Tanah Emas,” “Reog” and “Berburu” are a bit mellower and have a jazzy flow that nods fondly back to some of the stylistic ground the band covered on their debut album, Save the Planet. — AllAboutJazz

    Personnel: Tohpati: guitars, guitar synthesizer; Indro Hardjodikoro: bass; Diki Suwarjiki: suling bamboo flute, tarompet; Endang Ramdan: kendang percussion; Demas Narawangsa: drums; Czech Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Michaela Ruzickova (track 1).


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    Bulimundo / Bulimundo + Djam Brancu Dja Жанр : Funana, Cabo Verde, Lusafrica Носитель : CD Страна-производитель диска (релиза) : E.U. Год издания : 1980, 2013 Издатель (лейбл) : Lusafrica Номер по каталогу : 56725 662812 Страна исполнителя (группы) : Cabo Verde Аудиокодек : FLAC (*.

    Тема на форуме



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    Jazz-groove, progressive, avant, έντεχνο, κιθαριστικό ποπ-ροκ και garage από The Man from Managra, Music Soup, B-Sides, Δημοσιοϋπαλληλικό Ρετιρέ κ.ά.

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    obrigad...

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    Josh Turner / Deep South Жанр : Country Носитель : WEB Страна-производитель диска (релиза) : USA Год издания : 2017 Издатель (лейбл) : MCA Nashville Страна исполнителя (группы) : USA Аудиокодек : FLAC ( * .

    Тема на форуме



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    http://www.cesaria-evora.com Artists Cesaria Evora – vocals Fernando Lopes Andrade – piano Domingos Fernandes – saxophone Joao Alves – guitar JOSN Neves – bass Paulino Vieira – cavaquinho Ademiro Miranda – percussion Antero Dos Santos – percussion Julian Corrales Subita –... Continue Reading →

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    Dayme ArocenaThere is something going on in Cuba that is, quite simply, raising the bar on music of all kinds. An incredibly talented and visionary group of Cuban millennials are reimagining their African roots through a lens that filters, jazz, soul and funk. And Daymé Arocena is literally giving voice to this movement.
    Her new album, Cubafonía, is yet another offering from a singer who sounds like a magical mash up of The Queen of Latin Music, Celia Cruz, and The Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. Her voice and the music defy expectations, drawing on the power of Afro-Cuban traditions, the nimble athleticism of jazz, and catchy pop melodies.
    “Mambo Na’ Ma” is the perfect example. It reminds us that New Orleans was once considered…

    114 MB  320 ** FLAC

    …the northern most port of Cuba (back in the 19th century when Cuban sailors visited the city). It’s an explosion of Crescent City horns and Cuban clave, with Arocena’s Spanglish vocals scatting across the top of it all with the power of a brass band march.

    There is not a dull moment on Cubafonía. It is a major statement on the progress of Daymé Arocena as an artist for the ages. And it reminds us that the best music moves the body and the spirit.


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     :...

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    Muito obrigado, grande post.  :...

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    5*

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    Να πω από την αρχή πως εδώ έχουμε να κάνουμε με το καλύτερο, ωραιότερο, ή όπως αλλιώς θέλετε πείτε το, άλμπουμ με σιτάρ (με το σιτάρ πρωταγωνιστή εννοώ), που ηχογραφήθηκε ποτέ στον τόπο μας. Κι αυτό από μόνο του, για μένα (υποθέτω και για άλλους), έχει τη σημασία που έχει.
    Άκουσα για πρώτη φορά τον Δημήτρη Ρουμελιώτη και τους Ιχώρ, live, πριν καμμιά δεκαπενταριά χρόνια έχοντας γράψει, εντυπωσιασμένος, τα σχετικά, τότε, στο Jazz & Τζαζ. Ακόμη περισσότερο είχα «φύγει» από ένα demo, που είχε φτάσει εκείνη την εποχή στα χέρια μου (από τον ίδιο τον Ρουμελιώτη προφανώς) και το οποίο, δυστυχώς, δεν κατόρθωσε να βρει, μέσα στα χρόνια, μια διέξοδο προς τη δισκογραφία. Πάντως, τώρα, χαίρομαι διπλά… και γιατί βλέπω, επιτέλους, ένα άλμπουμ των Ιχώρ σε κύκλο, και γιατί σ’ αυτό το CD αναγνωρίζω tracks από ’κείνο το παλαιό demo (όπως τη «Χαρμολύπη» φερ’ ειπείν).
    ajazz%2Bihor.jpg
    Το συγκεκριμένο άλμπουμ των Ιχώρ ηχογραφήθηκε το περασμένο καλοκαίρι-φθινόπωρο από τους Δημήτρη Ρουμελιώτη σιτάρ, φωνή, Satnam Ghai τάμπλας, Λυδία Ρουμελιώτη κανόνας, Δανάη Ρουμελιώτη βιολί, Γιάννη Ευσταθόπουλο κρουστά, Ορέστη Ζαφειρόπουλο τσέλο και αποτελείται από έξι μεγάλης διάρκειας, γενικώς, συνθέσεις (του Ρουμελιώτη), με τη μικρότερη ν’ αγγίζει τα έξι λεπτά και με τη μεγαλύτερη να ξεπερνάει τα δέκα οκτώ. Τονίζω τις διάρκειες, καθότι στην περίπτωσή μας έχουμε να κάνουμε με ινδοπρεπείς συνθέσεις, που θέλουν το χρόνο τους (και στη δισκογραφία), για να αναπτυχθούν και να δείξουν.
    Έτσι λοιπόν, και στηριζόμενος σε ινδικές παραδοσιακές ragas, που αφορούν συγκεκριμένες ώρες της ημέρας, ψυχολογικές διαθέσεις κ.λπ. (Simhendra Madhyamam, Asawari, Piloo, Khamaj, Bhairav, Kirwani, Bhairavi) ο Ρουμελιώτης απλώνει-αναπτύσσει μια σειρά συνθέσεων, που έχουν τη μαγεία και τη δύναμη να σε «ταξιδεύουν». Κάτι που οφείλεται, βεβαίως, στα παιξίματα του σιτάρ, που διατηρούν δια παντός και αιωνίως αυτή την ανείπωτη ψυχεδελική αύρα, αλλά και στις συνθέσεις αυτές καθ’ αυτές και στον τρόπο που εκείνες ενοργανώνονται. Εννοώ πως η παρουσία-συμμετοχή των υπολοίπων μουσικών είναι εξ ίσου σημαντική, μεταφέροντας, όλοι τους, στις συνθέσεις τού Ρουμελιώτη έναν εντυπωσιακό groovy αέρα.
    Εξ ίσου επιτυχές (και κάτι παραπάνω!) είναι περαιτέρω και το μπόλιασμα των συνθέσεων στο «Ιχώρ» με το ελληνικό στοιχείο, που δεν είναι άλλο από τον λόγο. Τον υπερβατικό ποιητικό λόγο του Νικηφόρου Βρεττάκου στο «Τον κόσμο που ονειρεύτηκα…» [«Ακούω βροντές μες στη σιωπή, σάμπως να περπατούν λουλούδια! Όπως (καθώς απαρχής της ζωής μου), εβάδιζα πάνω σε χαλίκια κι αγκάθια, πότε μ’ έναν ιβίσκο στ’ αυτί μου και πότε μ’ έναν κρίνο στο χέρι μου, είχα την αίσθηση πως με φωτογράφιζαν άγγελοι»], αλλά και του ίδιου του Ρουμελιώτη στο φοβερό έσχατο track «Μετάγγιση» («Διόνυσος και Χριστός, εσάστησαν παρέα/ Και σαν εστάθη κι ο ουρανός και πάγωσε κι η μέρα/ Διόνυσος και Χριστός επάγωσαν παρέα/ κι έσβησε κι ο ουρανός κι έκλαψε κι η μέρα»), που είναι από μόνο του ικανό να σε «στείλει».
    Δεν έχω άλλα λόγια να πω γι’ αυτό το εκπληκτικό άλμπουμ!

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    5*

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    5*

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